Band of Giants

BAND OF GIANTS was honored in  2015 with the History Medal Award from the Daughters of the American Revolution

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 Band of Giants:  readers’ comments (verbatim from Amazon):

Truthfully, I had a hard time putting it down…and cried at the end.
. . . the kind of book I will keep and read again.
A real page turner . . .
Concise, dramatic and fast moving . . .
This is the best military history I have read.
It reads like a novel.
I rate this as a great book!
Extremely well researched and presented. It moves along at a fast pace . . .
I have read many books on this period but none tells the story any better . . .

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View a Reading and Discussion of Band of Giants
on C-SPAN 2 BOOK TV  Click HERE to watch

“A lively narrative of the Revolutionary War . . . Mr. Kelly packs in a remarkable amount of information, thanks to his lean, readable prose and a smoothly integrated structure.”  – THE WALL STREET JOURNAL

“Jack Kelly has managed to accomplish something remarkable” – Paul Lockhart

“Readers will finish this fascinating book with a sense of awe – and a renewed faith in America’s ability to overcome daunting challenges.”  -Thomas Fleming, author of Liberty! The American Revolution

Now available from Palgrave Macmillan (click buttons on the right to order)

Band of Giants brings to life, in a vivid and moving narrative, the founders who fought for freedom and the great war that secured our independence. Jefferson, Adams and Franklin are known to most Americans — men like Morgan, Greene and Wayne are less familiar. Yet the ideals of the politicians only became real because fighting men were willing to take on the grim, risky, sometimes brutal work of war. We know Fort Knox, but what about Henry Knox, the burly Boston bookseller who took over the American artillery at the age of twenty-five? Eighteen counties in the United States commemorate Richard Montgomery, but how many of us know that this revered martyr of the Revolution launched a full-scale invasion of Canada only months after the war broke out?

The soldiers of the Revolution were a diverse lot: merchants and mechanics, farmers and fishermen, paragons and drunkards. A few were trained military men, most ardent amateurs. Even George Washington, assigned to take over the army around Boston in 1775, went out and bought a book on military tactics. That these inexperienced warriors could take on and defeat the superpower of the day was one of the remarkable feats in world history.

“We have lived an age in a few years,” said one who experienced those turbulent times. Band of Giants gives readers a taste of the sheer intensity of experience that lit the minds of the revolutionary fighters. It examines the decisions, mistakes, fears, risks, and emotions that weighed on the men who led the effort. It draws attention to the fraught conditions under which the patriots fought — the bitterly divided populace, the lack of supplies, the repeated setbacks on the battlefield, and the appalling physical hardships. The troops often fought without blankets, shoes or food or pay — yet they endured and, miraculously, won.

Jack Kelly has done a masterful job of retelling the story of the Revolutionary War. . . .  This book is highly recommended for anyone seeking to understand the birth of the United States.  -Willard Sterne Randall, author of Thomas Jefferson: A Life

A superb account of the American soldiers who won our independence against great odds.  -General Anthony C. Zinni USMC (Retired), former Commander in Chief of the United States Central Command

Kelly doesn’t just narrate a series of events. Instead, he reveals the war’s most compelling dramas and personalities, giving the reader a sense of what it was like to experience the Revolution firsthand.  -Edward G. Lengel, author of General George Washington: A Military Life

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